A government proposal for a 10-mile wall around Burning Man could kill the festival in the middle of the desert favored by Silicon Valley elite

Burning Man

  • Burning
    Man
    , the annual arts and culture festival in the Nevada desert,
    is known to
    attract many Silicon Valley elite
    among its 80,000
    attendees.
  • The federal agency
    that administers the Black Rock Desert has proposed building a
    10-mile concrete wall around the festival and making Burning Man
    pay for it.
  • In response,
    Burning Man organizers say
    such a proposal “would forever
    negatively change the fabric of the Burning Man event, if not
    outright kill it.”

Some of the most high-profile tech executives — including Mark
Zuckerberg, Elon Musk, and Google’s cofounders —
are known to frequent
Burning Man, the
wild weeklong arts festival
that attracts upward of 80,000
people to the Nevada desert every year.

But a new proposal, from the federal agency that oversees the
land that Burning Man calls home, threatens to disrupt the
inclusive, unstructured, creative
principles the festival is
based on. Nevada’s Bureau of
Land Management
has proposed constructing a 10-mile concrete
barrier around Black Rock City, the desert area where Burning Man
takes place.


The proposal calls for
“hardened physical perimeter barriers”
as well as a fleet of contracted private security to screen those
entering the event — all paid for by the Burning Man Project,
the nonprofit that puts on the annual event. The “perimeter fence”
would “enhance site security, define the Event site, and prevent
windblown trash from leaving the site,” Nevada’s federal agency
says.

But Burning Man and its thousands of attendees are fighting
against the proposal.
Burning Man’s organizers say
the proposals are in “direct
conflict with our community’s core principles,” and threaten to
“forever negatively change the fabric of the Burning Man event, if
not outright kill it.”

The future of BRC is at risk. The BLM has
recommended untenable changes to our permit. Some proposals are in
direct conflict with our core values & would forever negatively
change the fabric of the event, if not kill it. We need your
support—and quickly.https://t.co/b0TKN6w4ua

— Burning Man (@burningman)
April 5, 2019

These proposed changes come as Burning Man’s organizers are
working to secure a 10-year permit for Black Rock City in the
desert, where the event has been held since 1990. The changes are
based off the
Bureau of Land Management’s review
of the potential
“environmental, social, and economic consequences” of Burning Man
on the Nevada dessert.

The federal agency’s report says that implementing such changes
to Burning Man would “prevent unnecessary or undue degradation of
lands while providing for public health and safety.”

Yet one of the aspects of Burning Man that its organizers stress
is the event’s “Leaving
No Trace
” principle. The process of
cleaning up trash
— or the MOOP (matter out of place) line,
as organizers call it — is a group effort that attendees are
expected to help out with after the event has ended. A dedicated
Playa Restoration Team is formed
to carefully sweep the area
of Burning Man for any leftover
trash camps have left.

Read more:
What it’s like to visit Burning Man, one of the wildest, most
surreal events in the world

The changes that Nevada’s land management bureau are calling for
amounts to nearly $20 million per year, the Burning Man Project
estimates. Organizers say these funds could translate to increasing
ticket prices by nearly $300 per attendee.

Burning Man isn’t scheduled until late August, and organizers in
the meantime are encouraging “interested parties” to
submit public comments
to Nevada’s Bureau of Land
Management.

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Source: FS – All-Travel destinations-News
A government proposal for a 10-mile wall around Burning Man could kill the festival in the middle of the desert favored by Silicon Valley elite